Thursday, August 17, 2017

Threaded Running Stitch


 The Threaded Running Stitch is the latest stitch I have learned on my 100 Stitches Plus journey.

As you can see by the picture {and figure out from the name}, this stitch is formed of two rows of Running Stitch that are threaded.  The threading can be done with a contrasting color floss.

To demonstrate this stitch, I chose two different floss colors.  For the two rows of Running Stitch, I used DMC color variations 4022. For the threading, I used DMC 995.  Both are perle cotton floss.



For the best looking result, I found it was a good idea to draw two parallel guidelines to keep the stitching straight and evenly spaced.  These two lines are 1/4" apart:


The first step is stitching the two rows of Running Stitch:




Notice these stitches line up so that the top and bottom match.  This makes it easier to thread them as "sets" of stitches:


Now for the threading:


I started at the left edge of the bottom line of Straight Stitches.  I came up through the fabric right under the first Straight Stitch:


I pulled the floss all the way through and then slid the needle under that first Running Stitch and over the first Running Stitch on the top row:


I pulled the floss all the way through:


Then I slid the needle under the top Running Stitch and under the bottom Running Stitch:


I gently pulled the floss all the way through:


Now for the next set of Running Stitches, I slid the needle under the bottom stitch and over the top stitch:


Then I pulled the floss through, being careful not to pull the whole way - this is so a nice loop will form under the bottom line of Running Stitches. 

I next slid the needle under the top and then the bottom stitch:


I continued lacing each set of Running Stitches in the same way:


and when I reached the last set, I went back into the fabric directly under the bottom Running Stitch:


Done!  


Here is a look at the underside of the stitch:


I think this is such a beautiful addition to the Running Stitch.  Two others I have learned are the Laced Running Stitch and the Whipped Running Stitch.  You can see those in a previous post here {here}. 


I found this stitch in the book Embroidery Stitches by Mary Webb.

Wednesday, August 2, 2017

Teddy Bear Embroidery Pattern


If you follow me on Instagram, you may have seen my stitching progress on this little teddy bear project.
 

I have just finished the stitching and I am so pleased with the result! 






I think roasting marshmallows over a campfire is a perfect summer motif :)  This pattern set has so many scenes like this one. I want to stitch them all up and I plan to incorporate them into a boy's quilt.

 

Saturday, July 22, 2017

Burden Stitch


Time for another 100 Stitches Plus post!  I just learned how to do this beautiful filling stitch called the Burden Stitch.  

I used perle cotton floss in three different colors.  The bright blue is DMC no. 995, the pink is DMC no. 956 and the light blue is a DMC color variations no. 4022.



The Burden Stitch is a filling stitch.  It is composed of Straight Stitches that are laid horizontally and held in place by vertical Straight Stitches.  

I used the bright blue floss for the horizontal stitches:



I came up through the fabric:


pulled the floss all the way through and went back into the fabric to the right of where my floss first emerged. 



I pulled the floss all the way through and that formed the first horizontal Straight Stitch.



I made five more of these stitches - equally spaced:



Now for the vertical Straight Stitches.  These will be done with the color variations blue and the pink flosses. 



I started with the color variations blue floss.  These stitches will be holding the laid horizontal Straight Stitches in place.  I first came up through the fabric above the first horizontal Straight Stitch: 




and went back into the fabric right above the next horizontal Straight Stitch:


I pulled the floss all the way through to form the first vertical Straight Stitch.  
Next, I formed evenly spaced vertical Straight Stitches all along the horizontal Straight Stitch. 


Next, I used the pink floss.  Notice that I am starting this by coming up through the fabric right below the top horizontal Straight Stitch:


I went back into the fabric right above the third horizontal Straight Stitch:


I kept making these vertical Straight Stitches, alternating the floss colors until I had covered all the horizontal Straight Stitches:


This is a simple stitch to do.  I imagine it would be very effective at filling in large open spaces in embroidery motifs.  I also think it would be nice to use as a border:



Here is a look at the underside of this stitch:





I learned this stitch from the excellent book Embroidery Stitches by Mary Webb.

Saturday, June 24, 2017

Folk Art Flowers Embroidery


This motif I am currently stitching is from a new embroidery pattern set available in my Etsy shop!
This one is called Folk Art Flowers.  
If you follow me on Instagram, you may have seen a screen shot I shared that showed my in-progress drawing of this set: 


These folk art style flowers are so fun to draw and perfect for hand embroidery.  I am really looking forward to stitching all of them!








Tuesday, June 13, 2017

Basket Filling Stitch



Time for another 100 Stitches Plus post!

This beautiful stitch, called the Basket Filling Stitch is the latest stitch I have learned.   This is a really easy stitch to do and I love the "basket weave" effect it gives.

For my demonstration, I am using a color variations perle cotton floss. This is DMC color number 4200. 



The Basket Filling Stitch is also called the Basket Satin Stitch because it is made up of vertical and horizontal Satin Stitches - {which are just individual Straight Stitches}.  The stitches are arranged in blocks of four stitches.  The blocks alternate between vertical and horizontal. 

To start, I came up through the fabric:



and made my first vertical stitch:


then the second:


and then two more for a total of four evenly spaced stitches:


Then I started the horizontal block:


making four evenly spaced horizontal stitches. Notice that this block is slightly smaller {height-wise} than the vertical block.  This is important for the basket weaving effect: 


Now another block of vertical stitches.  Notice this block is the same size as the first vertical block:


And now for the next block - starting a new row.  This is going to be a horizontal block.  Notice this is going to be a bit bigger {width wise} than the vertical block above it.  Again, this is important for the basket weave effect:




I continued alternating blocks




Until I formed a three block by three block square.





 Here is a look at the underside of this stitch:


Done!



This stitch is from the book Embroidery Stitches by Mary Webb.